Las Vegas Shooting Was Deadliest in U.S. History, Leaving 58 Dead and 489 Injured

“Too many Americans fear for their safety and the safety of their families. It is time for us to step up and say we will not tolerate this senseless killing anymore,” said Lesser

 

BOSTON — Today the State Senate voted 38-0 to ban the use or sale of “bump stocks” and “trigger cranks,” attachments used by the Las Vegas shooter on Oct. 1 which enable semi-automatic rifles to fire faster, simulating automatic fire. The Las Vegas mass shooting was the worst in U.S. history, leaving 58 dead and 489 injured.

Banning “bump stocks” and “trigger cranks” have been a unifying issue in the debate over reducing gun violence. The National Rifle Association announced on Oct. 5 that it was open to new regulations on such devices.

Following the vote, State Senator Eric P. Lesser issued the following statement:

“There are commonsense solutions to reducing gun violence while protecting the Second Amendment. Banning ‘bump stocks’ and ‘trigger cranks’ is one of those commonsense solutions.

“Too many parents have had to bury their children, too many movie-goers have had a fun night out turn into a nightmare and too many Americans fear for their safety and the safety of their families. It is time for us to step up and say we will not tolerate this senseless killing anymore — or the ease with which it is carried out.

“I understand that no one law will end our epidemic of gun violence, but there are actions we can and must take today that make it harder to commit mass murder and to keep weapons of mass murder out of the hands of criminals. Western Mass has a long tradition of hunting and sportsmanship, but bump stocks and trigger cranks are designed to turn semi-automatic guns used by hunters or hobbyists into weapons of war capable of inflicting terror in our communities. They should be illegal.

“This is not an issue that should be used to divide us. We can come together even on these tough issues of life and death as long as we listen to each other and continue to look out for our neighbors the way we have always done in our communities and across our country.”

The vote came a week after a report that the Las Vegas shooter had researched concert venues in Boston and searched for hotels near Fenway Park.

Similar legislation passed the State House of Representatives the previous day.

Legislation banning bump stocks at the federal level was introduced by a bipartisan group of 20 legislators in the U.S. House of Representatives on Oct. 10.

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